Fabrik and recovery

This interview was conducted in Melinda’s beautiful straw bale home on the land of the Kaurna people, sovereignty never ceded. It is about fabrik and blankets and art and bushfires and recovery. It is important and inspirational and is just the beginning of a long story waiting to be told.

This is an image of the drawing on the wall by Belinda Broughton, she lost her house and drew a representation of her property on the wall of the gallery, using charcoal from the fire.
The artwork is called Charcoal Drawing with No Name
 
The installation in the foreground is by Evette Sunset and it is called Eye of the Storm
 
The exhibition was called Solastalgia and it was curated by Jo Wilmot. It showed at Fabrik during the 2020 Fringe Festival.

When you have listened to part 2 and 3 you will understand what this is all about.

Artist: Pauline Cockrill
Title: Picking up the pieces

SW Community Centre

Marjon Martin has lived in the inner city of Adelaide since 1994. Born in the Netherlands and from the age of 8  grew up in the western suburbs of Sydney. After a fair bit of travel around the world she chose Adelaide as the place to live. “I think the strength of communities determines the quality of life we lead. I enjoy telling stories as a means of sharing experiences.” Marjon shares her extensive knowledge about building community and the importance of community centres and inclusivity.

The photo shows just a little of what goes on in the South West Community Centre.

 

MAGE

This short conversation with Sharon Ede is a teaser for a longer interview that will go into more depth on Sharon’s new book MAGE which will be launched in mid-March. First let me say I loved it; I reckon it has something for everyone. Because our chat was mobile to mobile there are some digital crackles, but it is enough to whet your appetite for more of what MAGE offers.

Sharon is an urbanist and activist with a background in grassroots environmental work, particularly with Urban Ecology Australia in the ecological cities movement, and as a cofounder of the Post Growth Institute. She has worked in State government in South Australia for twenty years, in roles including environmental planning, greening of government, resource efficiency and collaborative economy.

Sharon set up Share Adelaide in 2012 to map local community sharing activitycurate community based sharing ideas and news for South Australia, including national and international content, and wrote about her experiences and discoveries on communication and behaviour change for sustainability at Cruxcatalyst.

Sharon was selected as a Sharing Cities Fellow in 2016 by US-based Shareable to collaborate on producing a book, contributing to the Housing and Mobility chapters of ‘Sharing Cities: Activating the Urban Commons’, and in 2017 successfully advocated for funding for community based shared fabrication spaces, including the flagship Makerspace Adelaide.

In 2020, she published her first fiction novel, MAGE, which has the tagline: ‘What if we could feel the future before it arrives?’

 

 

about Jim

Here is a very condensed version of some of Jim Gale’s anti-apartheid activism, the Gale family’s involvement in the 1971 Springbok rugby tour and the days leading up to and after Jim’s untimely death.

 

early days

Here are some snippets of Irene’s early life, including a love letter, a poem from brother to sister, and a tribute to her dad.

 

Tracey from APN

Tracey works very casually as a crowd intoxicator in the event hospitality industry and is an incredible advocate for people living on low incomes. She tells a very compelling story about what she did with the extra money she received when Newstart became Jobseeker. The interview was recorded last year but is very topical now, with lots of references to the perils of casualising the work force.  APN is the Anti-Poverty Network.

 

Pru La Motte

A Way of Being. An exhibition put together by Pru’s daughter, Margie Medlin, actually in Pru’s Frida style house, showcasing the multi-dimensional talent of this amazing craftswoman, artist and feminist Pru La Motte. It was recorded on the opening day of the exhibition and captures the quirkiness that was Pru, with background noise and people wandering in and out. Anne Levy and Marjon Martin added their comments as they came into the display room that was Pru’s dining room. The photo gives a tiny taste. This is the first part of a series that will honour Pru’s life and work.

 

 

Lisa Lanzi

I thoroughly enjoyed this conversation with Lisa, listen up as she talks about how she got through 2020 and her up and coming interactive gig, Pub Sing

Lisa Lanzi has worked in all areas of the performing arts, securing her first professional gigs at only eight years of age.  Training extensively in her home town of Sydney in classical, tap, jazz and contemporary, Lisa worked as a freelance performer whilst completing a Diploma in Visual Arts (TAFE NSW) and teaching dance at the famed Bodenweiser Dance Centre. Upon moving to Adelaide she completed a degree in Performing Arts (Dance) at Adelaide University followed by an Advanced Diploma of Acting at Adelaide College of the Arts.

As a teacher, lecturer, performer, mentor, director and choreographer Lisa has worked for The Australia Council, Country Arts SA, Carclew Youth Arts Centre, State Theatre Company SA, Australian Dance Theatre, Adelaide Festival and Fringe, Adelaide Cabaret Festival and Cabaret Fringe, Adelaide University, Adelaide College of the Arts, in secondary schools across South Australia, local Councils and private corporations plus the curated Singapore International Fringe Festival to name a few.  She co-founded dance theatre company Splinter and was a cabaret performer with The Tapperuccis for many years.  Lisa’s practice has encompassed community and professional arts projects and her latest projects are with BodySONG and BODYmap.

As co-director of BodySONG Lisa runs community singing events across Adelaide plus a number of movement, theatre and cross-artform in-theatre projects as well as presenting at national conferences and for corporate team-building through song and movement.  With BODYmap, Lisa runs community dance projects and events for older persons, intergenerational groups plus master classes for the likes of Parkinson’s SA and Active Ageing Australia.  “The work I embark upon with people who have not trained as dancers gives me a rare insight into meaningful movement and the enormous impact of dance which subsequently imparts knowledge and intent to my professional areas of practice.”

Lisa is also regularly invited to perform, choreograph and direct work for various companies and institutions in Adelaide and is exploring new horizons as a performer in film and television.  She continues to undertake professional development in theatre and film and is furthering her study of Estill Voice Work. Her career as an actor and theatre director has also imparted much to her choreographic praxis and a desire to make work that combines text with choreography.

 

Importance of early learning

Part 1 and 2 of a wonderful chat I had with Mel Angel and Ned Baulderstone on the importance of early childhood learning and language and place. A fine example of what can be achieved and the benefits that can come from a collaboration with children, teachers, artists and in this case a Kaurna cultural advisor Ngaitalya Tamaru. Part 2 has Ned singing some catchy little songs that came about through that collaboration.